SOUTHEAST ASIA CONSTRUCTION24 Oct 2016
72 Club Street, Goh Loo Club
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About a century old, this three-storey building was formerly a gentlemen’s club. The restoration team went all-out to retain original materials – old bricks were salvaged, sliced and pieced together to line a wall. Original green glazed balustrades, timber joists and floorboards were reused as much as possible. Old handmade glass panes were also retained, together with the basketball player-patterned metal window grilles from the 1950s – a reflection of the Club’s history as a centre to promote basketball in the Chinese community.

Going beyond conservation guidelines, the team restored and retained long-hidden unique interior columns that were only discovered during restoration works. A formerly cluttered rear courtyard was also reopened and converted into a pleasant roof deck to bring back the sense of airiness, light and spatial quality of the original space.

In addition, the team specially sourced for new green-glazed balustrades to match the original ones. New floor tiles for the property were selected for their likeness to period designs. Strengthening works were also carefully designed with new supporting floor beams inserted in sympathy to the original floor frame for a visually seamless outcome. The new link to the historic Ann Siang Hill Park has further entrenched the heritage values of the building.

Stone carvings, significant pieces of old furniture such as three-legged mahjong tables and calligraphy by historic figures were restored and showcased prominently onsite. On the external facade, a specially commissioned mural was painted across the entire side wall. Offering a cross-section illustration of the building’s interiors, it also serves to reintroduce significant historic personalities whose lives intertwined with the Club in one way or another – creating a distinguished masterpiece of the life and times at the venue, circa early 1900s.

Back to the main story: URA honours four projects for excellent restoration works